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  • Pediatric Gastroenterology, Nutrition, and Liver Diseases

  • Fellowship Program

  • Fellows

    The fellowship program in the subspeciality of pediatric gastroenterology, nutrition and liver diseases is a comprehensive program. Listed are the goals and expectations for each year.

    Effective in 2007, the pediatric gastroenterology, nutrition, and liver diseases fellowship program will be utilizing ERAS (the Electronic Residency Application Service) to process all applicants. Fellowship applicants should enroll in ERAS and apply for the next academic period.

    Visit the ERAS website: htthttps://www.aamc.org/services/eras/

    First Year

    • Research: Choose a research project and research mentor from the Brown University Faculty. Begin to learn the techniques necessary to conduct the project.
    • Clinical: Be able to present the differential diagnosis and management plan for all routine subspecialty patients. Demonstrate independent and effective communication with patients and families.
    • Procedural: Be able to complete a full upper endoscopy and colonoscopy to completion. Approximately one-third of the number of standard procedures, as recommended by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN 24:345, 1997), have been completed.
    • Teaching: Effectively communicate the rationale for patient management to the residents and medical students. Present a well-organized didactic conference.

    Second Year

    • Research: The trainee's research project is at the half-way point to completion. An abstract has been presented at the National Subspecialty Trainee Meeting sponsored by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition.
    • Clinical: Be able to present the differential diagnosis and management plan for all patients. The majority of patients and families consider the trainee their primary gastroenterologist.
    • Procedural: As defined by the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition (JPGN 24:345, 1997), be able to complete all standard procedures and to initiate all advanced procedures. Approximately two-thirds of the number of standard procedures, as recommended by the above reference, have been completed.
    • Teaching: Residents and medical students look primarily to the trainee for teaching in the subspecialty. Didactic conferences are in-depth.

    Third Year

    • Research: The research project has been completed. The data has been presented initially at the Department of Pediatrics Research Colloquium; subsequently, at a national meeting. A first-authored paper on the project is near completion.
    • Clinical: The patients and families consider the trainee their primary gastroenterologist. The trainee can independently and competently practice this subspecialty.
    • Procedural: All the recommended number of standard procedures (see above reference) have been completed. The trainee can independently perform these procedures. The indications and contraindications for all advanced procedures are understood.
    • Teaching: The trainee has accrued the necessary experience and skill to be able to present a subspecialty topic at a Pediatric Grand Rounds at any institution.